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Spring

Tuesday, April 14, 2009

Spring in My Garden

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I'm going to ask my friend Anne, who lives and gardens across the pond, if she knows what is the name of this flower. I'm fairly certain it's a type of ranunculus. Anne, can you help?









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8 comments:

Paz said...

I'm the last one to be able to help with the name. Although I did recently post a photo of what I was told was a ranunculus (if I remember correctly) but their petals were closed. Not open like this one.

Paz

Christine said...

I'm sure someone will know what it's name is, if not Anne. I'll take a look at your photo.
Be well.

Anonymous said...

Have looked for you Christine, what sort of leaf does it have? Haven't found anything yet. Most ranunculus have more rounded flowers, I can't find a daisy like one. I was thinking more of an aster?
Anne

Anonymous said...

Maybe Rudbeckia??
Anne

guild-rez said...

Paz asked me to indentify your flower and I believe it is a
"Japanese Anemone"
If you use Google search you can compare some pictures with your flower.

The Japanese anemone's name comes from the Greek word for "wind," and some other anemone species are called wind flowers. Colour is white, pink, or lavender. Each flower has five or more petallike sepals that enclose numerous golden stamens.

Paz is from New York, you are in California und I am writing a comment in Toronto Canada:)
What a small world..
- cheers Gisela.

Christine said...

I found it! It is indeed of the ranunculus family, and it is an anemone (thank you, Gisela!), but not a Japanese anemone (I have lots of those in my garden), it is an http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anemone_coronaria. Thank you all for the leads.

Anonymous said...

Glad you found what your flower was, the petals looked a lot slimmer than the ranunculus I have seen, but my son said that there are thousands of different varieties now. He mentioned it probably was an anemone. I have seen them here.
Anne

Christine said...

Thanks Anne! It's a double-petaled anemone coronaria.